Documentary

Life in a quarry

© Dipayan Bose
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Life in a quarry
India
Life in a quarry, photo essay by Dipayan Bose, from Purulia, India.
Irrespective of housewives and girls take part in this job. They collect the stones from the hilly region and break it into small pieces. Purulia, West Bengal – October 2017


PRIVATE 43, Other Side India (photo cover: Gauri Gill)
PRIVATE 43, Other Side India

This is a daily life documentation on village people in a stone quarry in Ayodhya hills at Purulia. They survive their life with such a low income with fewer scopes of earning sources. Almost five years back, when Ajodhya upper damp was being constructed, if Japanese engineers didn’t leave those unused stones in the valley, the scenario could have been different. Tourists may find a beautiful place to visit in Ajodhya but it couldn’t change the livelihood of some people. Maybe they have to be depended on their husbands, doing household works or doing something else which didn’t make them a self-earned member of her family, if those stones were not left, for another new turn.

Life in a quarry, photo essay by Dipayan Bose, from Purulia, India.
Women from all the age group is involved in this job as they earn money from it. They don’t need to invest anything it this business.
Women used to do their household jobs in the work area. They washed their clothes and all in the nearby pond. © Dipayan Bose
Women used to do their household jobs in the work area. They washed their clothes and all in the nearby pond.
Unitedly they do the stone breaking operation as well as household works.
They have a very lively life. In spite of their tough lifestyle they also enjoy their tiffin times and entertain themselves. © Dipayan Bose
They have a very lively life. In spite of their tough lifestyle they also enjoy their tiffin times and entertain themselves.
The only thing makes them more tensed when it comes to earning sources. Govt. strongly issued notice to not to dig the region for earning purpose. © Dipayan Bose
The only thing makes them more tensed when it comes to earning sources. Govt. strongly issued notice to not to dig the region for earning purpose. It causes natural loss. But in the other hand there is a strong chance to loose earning sources of these people.
Life of these children are under severe risk. There is a very uncertain future knocking behind these people. © Dipayan Bose
Life of these children are under severe risk. There is a very uncertain future knocking behind these people. They don’t know even what will be the next turn of their life. They are standing in front of such insecure life.
Life and nature are both under danger. To save one, one needs to sacrifice. This is probably the saddest turn of my entire documentary. © Dipayan Bose
Life and nature are both under danger. To save one, one needs to sacrifice. This is probably the saddest turn of my entire documentary.
The saddest part of this story was that when I asked them what will they do when these stone cells will get finished… © Dipayan Bose
The saddest part of this story was that when I asked them what will they do when these stone cells will get finished, which the engineers had left unused. And these village people neither have much fund nor permissions to blast a portion of that hill again. Really they don’t have any answers. They remain silent as well as the valley remains always.

Dipayan Bose
the authorDipayan Bose
Dipayan Bose (1992) is a Kolkata based documentary and street photographer. After completing his graduation, he started photography as a profession. He has worked as a freelance photographer under many organizations. Now he is a photography lecturer in ICAT DESIGN & MEDIA College, Chennai. According to him, Documenting human life, social issues, and environmental stories through photography is not only a documentation process but also it’s a proof of a time or incident. So it’s a responsibility to keep the truth through the lense for future references.

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