Photo exhibition

‘Surviving in Syria’ by Alessio Romenzi

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK – 2015 Yusef Hawkin’s face is gone and now this child’s face has also been totally erased from the world. I believe her name was Janelle Lynn McCleese, born in 1987 and died in 1990. How did she die? I have imagined that she was hit by a car. The mural lived much longer than she did. Perhaps brevity really is part of the beauty and function of these murals—that their eventual loss further reflects the neighborhood’s demographic changes, the passage of time, the brevity of life. I won’t ever forget Janelle’s face and her lovingly fixed hair. She lives inside all of us who passed by and took notice of her as we walked down Lewis Ave.,-- us, the lucky living, wondrously and briefly animated by life.
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A mother and her son cry the lost of her other two sons, killed by a mortar attack launched by Al Asad forces, in Homs province on February 20, 2012. © Alessio Romenzi
A mother and her son cry the lost of her other two sons, killed by a mortar attack launched by Al Asad forces, in Homs province on February 20, 2012. © Alessio Romenzi

Alessio Romenzi, winner of the Lucas Dolega Award presents at La Esquina Gallery his great work: “Surviving in Syria”.


09 – 30 January, 2014
La Esquina – 83, Bd Longchamp – 13001 Marseille
More info : Galerie La Esquina.com


« I was interested in Syria since the beginning of the uprising of the Arab world and the ensuing civil war caught my attention right from the start. However, having access and being able to get inside the country was difficult: with the accelerating violence and unstable situation, it became almost impossible for journalists to know when and how to access hot spots of the conflict. At a crucial and defining moment for myself, I decided to go to Lebanon and wait for the right moment to get into Syria. It took me a lot of time to find a way in and it was not without hazards. Once inside, I had the chance get to the very heart of the conflict and to share with civilians their own tragic and hazardous experiences. I spent more than two months with Syrian families as well as with members of the Free Syrian army, trying to understand what they were thinking, feeling and experiencing. This is how I happened to be invited to capture their lives in very private moments. The purpose of this work is to raise awareness on what is happening in Syria and to make people reflect on the destruction and pain that war brings to people’s lives. »

Alessio Romenzi, born in 1974, is currently based in the Middle East. He has been extensively covering the so-called Arab Spring since the beginning, with a special focus on Egypt and Libya. He later moved to Syria, one of the first photographers to be smuggled in the country when the regime of Bashar al-Assad started to resort to heavy fire against the opposition, and to deny entry to journalists.

 

 

Véronique
the authorVéronique
Véronique Poczobut, photo editor of PRIVATE magazine.

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