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Modern Photographs, Thomas Walther Collection

Max Burchartz (German, 1887–1961). Lotte (Eye). 1928. Thomas Walther Collection. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Max Burchartz (German, 1887–1961). Lotte (Eye). 1928. Thomas Walther Collection. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

December 13, 2014–April 19, 2015 at the Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 Street, New York (USA) ; in the Edward Steichen Photography Galleries (third floor). More info : www.moma.org 

Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909-1949
The creative possibilities explored through photography were never richer or more varied than in the years between the First and Second World Wars, when photographers approached figuration, abstraction, and architecture with unmatched imaginative fervor. This vital moment is dramatically captured in the more than 300 photographs that constitute the Thomas Walther Collection at The Museum of Modern Art. This remarkable group of objects is presented together for the first time to coincide with the culmination of the Thomas Walther Collection Project — a four-year collaboration between the Museum’s curatorial and conservation staff, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which has transformed our understanding of the medium’s material history from this era. Made on the street and in the studio, intended for avant-garde exhibitions or the printed page, these objects provide unique insight into the radical intentions of their creators.

The Museum acquired more than 300 photographs from Thomas Walther’s private collection in 2001. Featuring iconic works by such towering figures as Berenice Abbott, Karl Blossfeldt, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Claude Cahun, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Florence Henri, André Kertész, Germaine Krull, El Lissitzky, Lucia Moholy, László Moholy-Nagy, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Maurice Tabard Umbo, and Edward Weston, along with lesser-known treasures by more than 100 other practitioners, this exhibition presents the exhilarating story of this key moment in photography’s history, allowing both experts and those less familiar with the medium to understand these photographs in new ways.


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