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Robert Adams – The Place We Live

Robert Adams, In a New Subdivision (in einem neuen Vorort), Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1969 Silbergelatine-Abzug, 15.2 x 15.2 cm Yale University Art Gallery, gekauft mit einer Schenkung von Saundra B. Lane und Zuschüssen aus dem Trellis Fund sowie dem Janet and Simeon Braguin Fund. © Robert Adams

Robert Adams, In a New Subdivision (in einem neuen Vorort), Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1969 Silbergelatine-Abzug, 15.2 x 15.2 cm Yale University Art Gallery, gekauft mit einer Schenkung von Saundra B. Lane und Zuschüssen aus dem Trellis Fund sowie dem Janet and Simeon Braguin Fund. © Robert Adams



ROBERT ADAMS – The Place We Live
Fotomuseum Winterthur, Gruezenstrasse 44 + 45, 8400 Winterthur, Switzerland | Event date > from: 07-06-2014 to: 31-08-2014 | Opening hours: Tue – Sun: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Wed: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m., Mon: closed | Official Website www.fotomuseum.ch

Adams (* 1937) is the foremost living landscape photographer of Americas West. This first major retrospective of his photography reveals the eloquence and redemptive power of Adams’ American landscape

Robert Adams is best known for his austere, nuanced photographs of suburban development in Colorado during the late 1960s, images that first came to prominence through his seminal book The New West published in 1974. He was a key contributor to the landmark exhibition New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape, organized by the International Museum of Photography and Film, Rochester, New York in 1975. The show made the case for a formally radical mode of landscape photography in which the Romantic and Symbolist predilections of the American modernists were displaced by a more impersonal, disinterested vision.

On the one hand, Adams’ black-and-white photographs reveal mankind’s increasingly tragic relationship with the natural world. Images of neglected highways, tree-cutting and suburban sprawl chart the impact on the environment of unfettered urban development and the thoughtless exploitation of natural resources. On the other hand, Adams’s photography constantly resists simplification, rendering with delicate precision the contradictions of everyday life.

Other major series in the exhibition include Our Lives and Our Children (1979–1983), a disarmingly tender series of portraits of people going about their lives in the shadow of a nearby nuclear waste plant, and Turning Back (1999-2003), a body of work that explores a landscape ravaged by clearcutting in the Pacific Northwestern area that Adams now calls home.

Submitted by Daniela Schwendimann.


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